THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN EFL LEARNERS’ LANGUAGE LEARNING STRATEGY USE, WILLINGNESS TO COMMUNICATE, AND L2 ACHİEVEMENT

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Number of pages: 78-92
Year-Number: 2017-18

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the interactions between EFL learners’ language learning strategy use, willingness to communicate (WTC), and L2 achievement. To do so, a quantitative study was conducted with 79 tertiary level EFL learners. These participants were prep-class students from two different state universities, and they were having intensive language courses during that one-year education. Data was collected using a 70-item composite instrument. To measure language learning strategy use of the participants, Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory for Language Learners (SILL) was used, and L2 WTC levels of the learners were determined via McCroskey’s (1992) WTC scale. L2 achievement scores were calculated using their first term quiz and midterm results. To analyze the available data, SPSS Statistics 22.0 software was used. The results indicated that metacognitive and social strategies are the most commonly favored strategy types by both genders. In addition, learners with higher WTC in L2 use language learning strategies more frequently, and affective and memory-related strategies are the best predictors of L2 WTC. Finally, findings displayed that although WTC and language learning strategies are two important constructs influencing each other, they do not lead to increased L2 achievement. To conclude, this study clearly showed that WTC levels of the learners can be increased by providing the learners with strategy training and guiding them to use more strategies, so that, they can feel comfortable to use L2 in communication. Especially, affective and memory-related strategies need to be emphasized because of their greater predictive ability on L2 WTC.

Keywords

Abstract

This study aimed to explore the interactions between EFL learners’ language learning strategy use, willingness to communicate (WTC), and L2 achievement. To do so, a quantitative study was conducted with 79 tertiary level EFL learners. These participants were prep-class students from two different state universities, and they were having intensive language courses during that one-year education. Data was collected using a 70-item composite instrument. To measure language learning strategy use of the participants, Oxford’s (1990) Strategy Inventory for Language Learners (SILL) was used, and L2 WTC levels of the learners were determined via McCroskey’s (1992) WTC scale. L2 achievement scores were calculated using their first term quiz and midterm results. To analyze the available data, SPSS Statistics 22.0 software was used. The results indicated that metacognitive and social strategies are the most commonly favored strategy types by both genders. In addition, learners with higher WTC in L2 use language learning strategies more frequently, and affective and memory-related strategies are the best predictors of L2 WTC. Finally, findings displayed that although WTC and language learning strategies are two important constructs influencing each other, they do not lead to increased L2 achievement. To conclude, this study clearly showed that WTC levels of the learners can be increased by providing the learners with strategy training and guiding them to use more strategies, so that, they can feel comfortable to use L2 in communication. Especially, affective and memory-related strategies need to be emphasized because of their greater predictive ability on L2 WTC.

Keywords