DOGME APPROACH IN ONLINE ENGLISH CLASSES

Author:

Number of pages: 376-384
Year-Number: 2021-37

Abstract

Due to the recent pandemic situation, the education system has to alter the dynamic in online teaching. The Dogme is the philosophy that can achieve such dynamism. This paper investigates whether or not foreign/second language (L2) learners consider the Dogme online lessons as an inspiring and fluency-driven environment that evokes confidence while conveying information in the target language. The Willingness to Communicate scale (WTC) aimed at determining the perceptions of English language learners about the environment created in online classes that implement the Dogme Approach. For this purpose, we administered the questionnaire to 33 participants (Turkish, Russian, Turkmen, and Arabic), ranging from high school graduates to Master’s degree or above holders aged between 16 and 50 at various language centers. The results indicate that the respondents draw inspiration to speak English with the close-knit community and relatives. In contrast, they reluctantly help a foreigner in a critical situation or challenge a dialogue in a formal situation; however, talking to acquaintances seems appealing to them. Despite the unwillingness to communicate in certain circumstances, the students’ self-view of fluency turns out to be high. Future research may focus on the application of the Dogme in intensive English programs, English for specific purposes (ESP), teachers’ work, and elementary classes.

 

 

Keywords

Abstract

Due to the recent pandemic situation, the education system has to alter the dynamic in online teaching. The Dogme is the philosophy that can achieve such dynamism. This paper investigates whether or not foreign/second language (L2) learners consider the Dogme online lessons as an inspiring and fluency-driven environment that evokes confidence while conveying information in the target language. The Willingness to Communicate scale (WTC) aimed at determining the perceptions of English language learners about the environment created in online classes that implement the Dogme Approach. For this purpose, we administered the questionnaire to 33 participants (Turkish, Russian, Turkmen, and Arabic), ranging from high school graduates to Master’s degree or above holders aged between 16 and 50 at various language centers. The results indicate that the respondents draw inspiration to speak English with the close-knit community and relatives. In contrast, they reluctantly help a foreigner in a critical situation or challenge a dialogue in a formal situation; however, talking to acquaintances seems appealing to them. Despite the unwillingness to communicate in certain circumstances, the students’ self-view of fluency turns out to be high. Future research may focus on the application of the Dogme in intensive English programs, English for specific purposes (ESP), teachers’ work, and elementary classes.

Keywords